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1                                   Tux Paint
2                                 version 0.9.22
3                              Extending Tux Paint
4
5                Copyright 2002-2009 by Bill Kendrick and others
6                               New Breed Software
7
8                           bill@newbreedsoftware.com
9                            http://www.tuxpaint.org/
10
11                          June 14, 2002 - July 1, 2009
12
13     ----------------------------------------------------------------------
14
15   If you wish to add or change things like Brushes and Rubber Stamps used by
16   Tux Paint, you can do it fairly easily by simply putting or removing files
17   on your hard disk.
18
19   Note: You'll need to restart Tux Paint for the changes to take effect.
20
21Where Files Go
22
23  Standard Files
24
25       Tux Paint looks for its various data files in its 'data' directory.
26
27    Linux and Unix
28
29         Where this directory goes depends on what value was set for
30         "DATA_PREFIX" when Tux Paint was built. See INSTALL.txt for details.
31
32         By default, though, the directory is:
33
34           /usr/local/share/tuxpaint/
35
36         If you installed from a package, it is more likely to be:
37
38           /usr/share/tuxpaint/
39
40    Windows
41
42         Tux Paint looks for a directory called 'data' in the same directory
43         as the executable. This is the directory that the installer used
44         when installing Tux Paint e.g.:
45
46           C:\Program Files\TuxPaint\data
47
48    Mac OS X
49
50         Tux Paint stores its data files inside the "Tux Paint" application
51         (which is actually a special kind of folder on Mac OS X). The
52         following steps explain how to get to the folders within:
53
54          1. Bring up a 'context' menu by holding the [Control] key and
55             clicking the Tux Paint icon the in Finder. (If you have a mouse
56             with more than one button, you can simply right-click the icon.)
57          2. Select "Show Contents" from the menu that appears. A new Finder
58             window will appear with a folder inside called "Contents."
59          3. Open the "Contents" folder and open the "Resources" folder found
60             inside.
61          4. There, you will find the "starters", "stamps" and "brushes"
62             folders. Adding new content to these folders will make the
63             content available to any user that launches this copy (icon) of
64             Tux Paint.
65
66         Note: If you install a newer version of Tux Paint and replace or
67         discard the old version, you will lose changes made by following the
68         instructions above, so keep backups of your new content (stamps,
69         brushes, etc.).
70
71         Tux Paint also looks for files in a "TuxPaint" folder that you can
72         place in your system's "Application Support" folder (found under
73         "Library" at the root of your hard disk):
74
75           /Library/Application Support/TuxPaint/
76
77         It also looks for files in the user's "Application Support" folder:
78
79           /Users/(user name)/Library/Application Support/TuxPaint/
80
81         When you upgrade to a newer version of Tux Paint, the contents of
82         this TuxPaint folder will stay the same and remain accessible by all
83         users of Tux Paint.
84
85     ----------------------------------------------------------------------
86
87  Personal Files
88
89       You can also create brushes, stamps, fonts and 'starters' in your own
90       directory (folder) for Tux Paint to find.
91
92    Windows
93
94         Your personal Tux Paint folder is stored in your "Application Data".
95         For example, on newer Windows (set up for an English-speaking user):
96
97           C:\Documents and Settings\(user name)\Application Data\TuxPaint\
98
99    Mac OS X
100
101         Your personal Tux Paint folder is stored in your "Application
102         Support" folder:
103
104           /Users/(user name)/Library/Application Support/ TuxPaint/
105
106    Linux and Unix
107
108         Your personal Tux Paint directory is "$(HOME)/.tuxpaint/" (also
109         known as "~/.tuxpaint/".
110
111         That is, if your home directory is "/home/karl", then your Tux Paint
112         directory is "/home/karl/.tuxpaint/".
113
114         Don't forget the period (".") before the 'tuxpaint'!
115
116       To add brushes, stamps fonts, and 'starters,' create subdirectories
117       under your personal Tux Paint directory named "brushes", "stamps",
118       "fonts" and "starters" respectively.
119
120       (For example, if you created a brush named "flower.png", you would put
121       it in "~/.tuxpaint/brushes/" under Linux or Unix.)
122
123     ----------------------------------------------------------------------
124
125Brushes
126
127     The brushes used for drawing with the 'Brush' and 'Lines' tools in
128     Tux Paint are simply PNG image files.
129
130     The alpha (transparency) of the PNG image is used to determine the shape
131     of the brush, which means that the shape can be 'anti-aliased' and even
132     partially-transparent!
133
134     Greyscale pixels in the brush PNG will be drawn using the
135     currently-selected color in Tux Paint. Color pixels will be tinted.
136
137     Brush images should be no wider than 40 pixels across and no taller than
138     40 pixels high. (i.e., the maximum size can be 40 x 40.)
139
140  Brush Options
141
142       Aside from a graphical shape, brushes can also be given other
143       attributes. To do this, you need to create a 'data file' for the
144       brush.
145
146       A brush data file is simply a text file containing the options.
147
148       The file has the same name as the PNG image, but a ".dat" extension.
149       (e.g., "brush.png"'s data file is the text file "brush.dat" in the
150       same directory.)
151
152    Brush Spacing
153
154         As of Tux Paint version 0.9.16, you can now specify the spacing for
155         brushes (that is, how often they are drawn). By default, the spacing
156         will be the brush's height, divided by 4.
157
158         Add a line containing the line "spacing=N" to the brush's data file,
159         where N is the spacing you want for the brush. (The lower the
160         number, the more often the brush is drawn.)
161
162    Animated Brushes
163
164         As of Tux Paint version 0.9.16, you may now create animated brushes.
165         As the brush is used, each frame of the animation is drawn.
166
167         Lay each frame out across a wide PNG image. For example, if your
168         brush is 30x30 and you have 5 frames, the image should be 150x30.
169
170         Add a line containing the line "frames=N" to the brush's data file,
171         where N is the number of frames in the brush.
172
173         Note: If you'd rather the frames be flipped through randomly, rather
174         than sequentially, also add a line containing "random" to the
175         brush's data file.
176
177    Directional Brushes
178
179         As of Tux Paint version 0.9.16, you may now create directional
180         brushes. As the brush is used, different shapes are drawn, depending
181         on the direction the brush is going.
182
183         The directional shapes are divided into a 3x3 square in a PNG image.
184         For example, if your brush is 30x30, the image should be 90x90, and
185         each of the direction's shapes placed in a 3x3 grid. The center
186         region is used for no motion. The top right is used for motion
187         that's both up, and to the right. And so on.
188
189         Add a line containing the line "directional" to the brush's data
190         file.
191
192    Animated Directional Brushes
193
194         You may mix both animated and directional features into one brush.
195         Use both options ("frames=N" and "directional"), in separate lines
196         in the brush's "".dat" file.
197
198         Lay the brush out so that each 3x3 set of directional shapes are
199         laid out across a wide PNG image. For example, if the brush is 30x30
200         and there are 5 frames, it would be 450x90. (The leftmost 150x90
201         pixels of the image represent the 9 direction shapes for the first
202         frame, for example.)
203
204     Place the brush image PNGs (and any data text files) in the "brushes"
205     directory.
206
207     Note: If your new brushes all come out as solid squares or rectangles,
208     it's because you forgot to use alpha transparency! See the documentation
209     file "PNG.txt" for more information and tips.
210
211     ----------------------------------------------------------------------
212
213Stamps
214
215     All stamp-related files go in the "stamps" directory. It's useful to
216     create subdirectories and sub-subdirectories there to organize the
217     stamps. (For example, you can have a "holidays" folder with "halloween"
218     and "christmas" sub-folders.)
219
220  Images
221
222       Rubber Stamps in Tux Paint can be made up of a number of separate
223       files. The one file that is required is, of course, the picture
224       itself.
225
226       As of Tux Paint version 0.9.17, Stamps may be either PNG bitmap images
227       or SVG vector images. They can be full-color or greyscale. The alpha
228       (transparency) channel of PNGs is used to determine the actual shape
229       of the picture (otherwise you'll stamp a large rectangle on your
230       drawings).
231
232       PNGs can be any size, and Tux Paint (by default) provides a set of
233       sizing buttons to let the user scale the stamp up (larger) and down
234       (smaller).
235
236       SVGs are vector-based, and will be scaled appropriately for the canvas
237       being used in Tux Paint.
238
239       Note: If your new PNG stamps all have solid rectangular-shaped
240       outlines of a solid color (e.g., white or black), it's because you
241       forgot to use alpha transparency! See the documentation file "PNG.txt"
242       for more information and tips.
243
244       Note: If your new SVG stamps seem to have a lot of whitespace, make
245       sure the SVG 'document' is no larger than the shape(s) within. If they
246       are being clipped, make sure the 'document' is large enough to contain
247       the shape(s). See the documentation file "SVG.txt" for more
248       information and tips.
249
250       Advanced Users: The Advanced Stamps HOWTO describes, in detail, how to
251       make PNG images which will scale perfectly when used as stamps in
252       Tux Paint.
253
254     ----------------------------------------------------------------------
255
256  Description Text
257
258       Text (".TXT") files with the same name as the PNG or SVG. (e.g.,
259       "picture.png"'s description is stored in "picture.txt" in the same
260       directory.)
261
262       The first line of the text file will be used as the US English
263       description of the stamp's image. It must be encoded in UTF-8.
264
265    Language Support
266
267         Additional lines can be added to the text file to provide
268         translations of the description, to be displayed when Tux Paint is
269         running in a different locale (like French or Spanish).
270
271         The beginning of the line should correspond to the language code of
272         the language in question (e.g., "fr" for French, and "zh_TW" for
273         Traditional Chinese), followed by ".utf8=" and the translated
274         description (encoded in UTF-8).
275
276         There are scripts in the "po" directory for converting the text
277         files to PO format (and back) for easy translation to different
278         languages. Therefore you should never add or change translations in
279         the .txt files directly.
280
281         If no translation is available for the language Tux Paint is
282         currently running in, the US English text is used.
283
284    Windows Users
285
286         Use NotePad or WordPad to edit/create these files. Be sure to save
287         them as Plain Text, and make sure they have ".txt" at the end of the
288         filename...
289
290     ----------------------------------------------------------------------
291
292  Sound Effects
293
294       WAVE (".wav") or OGG Vorbis (".ogg") files with the same name as the
295       PNG or SVG. (e.g., "picture.svg"'s sound effect is the sound file
296       "picture.wav" in the same directory.)
297
298    Language Support
299
300         For sounds for different locales (e.g., if the sound is someone
301         saying a word, and you want translated versions of the word said),
302         also create WAV or OGG files with the locale's label in the
303         filename, in the form: "STAMP_LOCALE.EXT"
304
305         "picture.png"'s sound effect, when Tux Paint is run in Spanish mode,
306         would be "picture_es.wav". In French mode, "picture_fr.wav". In
307         Brazilian Portuguese mode, "picture_pt_BR.wav". And so on...
308
309         If no localized sound effect can be loaded, Tux Paint will attempt
310         to load the 'default' sound file. (e.g., "picture.wav")
311
312       Note: For descriptive sounds (not sound effects, like a bang or a bird
313       chirping), consider using the Descriptive Sounds, described below.
314
315     ----------------------------------------------------------------------
316
317  Descriptive Sound
318
319       WAVE (".wav") or OGG Vorbis (".ogg") files with the same name as the
320       PNG or SVG, followed by "_desc" (e.g., "picture.svg"'s descriptive
321       sound is the sound file "picture_desc.ogg" in the same directory.)
322
323    Language Support
324
325         For descriptions in different languages, also create WAV or OGG
326         files with both "_desc" and the locale's label in the filename, in
327         the form: "STAMP_desc_LOCALE.EXT"
328
329         "picture.png"'s descriptive sound, when Tux Paint is run in Spanish
330         mode, would be "picture_desc_es.wav". In French mode,
331         "picture_desc_fr.wav". In Brazilian Portuguese mode,
332         "picture_desc_br_PT.wav". And so on...
333
334         If no localized descriptive sound can be loaded, Tux Paint will
335         attempt to load the 'default' descriptive sound file. (e.g.,
336         "picture_desc.wav")
337
338     ----------------------------------------------------------------------
339
340  Stamp Options
341
342       Aside from a graphical shape, a textual description, and a sound
343       effect, stamps can also be given other attributes. To do this, you
344       need to create a 'data file' for the stamp.
345
346       A stamp data file is simply a text file containing the options.
347
348       The file has the same name as the PNG or SVG image, but a ".dat"
349       extension. (e.g., "picture.png"'s data file is the text file
350       "picture.dat" in the same directory.)
351
352    Colored Stamps
353
354         Stamps can be made to be either "colorable" or "tintable."
355
356      Colorable
357
358           "Colorable" stamps they work much like brushes - you pick the
359           stamp to get the shape, and then pick the color you want it to be.
360           (Symbol stamps, like the mathematical and musical ones, are an
361           example.)
362
363           Nothing about the original image is used except the transparency
364           (from "alpha" channel). The color of the stamp comes out solid.
365
366           Add a line containing the word "colorable" to the stamp's data
367           file.
368
369      Tinted
370
371           "Tinted" stamps are similar to "colorable" ones, except the
372           details of the original image are kept. (To put it technically,
373           the original image is used, but its hue is changed, based on the
374           currently-selected color.)
375
376           Add a line containing the word "tintable" to the stamp's data
377           file.
378
379        Tinting Options:
380
381             Depending on the contents of your stamp, you might want to have
382             Tux Paint use one of a numer of methods when tinting it. Add one
383             of the following lines to the stamp's data file:
384
385             "tinter=normal" (default)
386                     This is the normal tinting mode. (Hue range is
387                     +/- 18 degrees, 27 replace.)
388
389             "tinter=anyhue"
390                     This remaps all hues in the stamp. (Hue range is
391                     +/- 180 degrees.)
392
393             "tinter=narrow"
394                     This like 'anyhue', but a narrower hue angle. (Hue range
395                     is +/- 6 degrees, 9 replace.)
396
397             "tinter=vector"
398                     This is map 'black through white' to 'black through
399                     destination'.
400
401    Unalterable Stamps
402
403         By default, a stamp can be flipped upside down, shown as a mirror
404         image, or both. This is done using the control buttons below the
405         stamp selector, at the lower right side of the screen in Tux Paint.
406
407         Sometimes, it doesn't make sense for a stamp to be flippable or
408         mirrored; for example, stamps of letters or numbers. Sometimes
409         stamps are symmetrical, so letting the user flip or mirror them
410         isn't useful.
411
412         To make a stamp un-flippable, add the option "noflip" to the stamp's
413         data file.
414
415         To keep a stamp from being mirrored, add a line containing the word
416         "nomirror" to the stamp's data file.
417
418    Initial Stamp Size
419
420         By default, Tux Paint assumes that your stamp is sized appropriately
421         for unscaled display on a 608x472 canvas. This is the original
422         Tux Paint canvas size, provided by a 640x480 screen. Tux Paint will
423         then adjust the stamp according to the current canvas size and, if
424         enabled, the user's stamp size controls.
425
426         If your stamp would be too big or too small, you can specify a scale
427         factor. If your stamp would be 2.5 times as wide (or tall) as it
428         should be, add the option "scale 40%" or "scale 5/2" or "scale 2.5"
429         or "scale 2:5" to your image. You may include an "=" if you wish, as
430         in "scale=40%".
431
432    Windows Users
433
434         You can use NotePad or WordPad to create these file. Be sure to save
435         it as Plain Text, and make sure the filename has ".dat" at the end,
436         and not ".txt"...
437
438  Pre-Mirrored and Flipped Images
439
440       In some cases, you may wish to provide a pre-drawn version of a
441       stamp's mirror-image, flipped image, or even both. For example,
442       imagine a picture of a fire truck with the words "Fire Department"
443       written across the side. You probably do not want that text to appear
444       backwards when the image is flipped!
445
446       To create a mirrored version of a stamp that you want Tux Paint to
447       use, rather than mirroring one on its own, simply create a second
448       ".png" or ".svg" graphics file with the same name, except with
449       "_mirror" before the filename extension.
450
451       For example, for the stamp "truck.png" you would create another file
452       named "truck_mirror.png", which will be used when the stamp is
453       mirrored (rather than using a backwards version of 'truck.png').
454
455       As of Tux Paint 0.9.18, you may similarly provide a pre-flipped image
456       with "_flip" in the name, and/or an image that is both mirrored and
457       flipped, by naming it "_mirror_flip".
458
459       Note: If the user flips and mirrors an image, and a pre-drawn
460       "_mirror_flip" doesn't exist, but either "_flip" or "_mirror" does, it
461       will be used, and mirrored or flipped, respectively.
462
463     ----------------------------------------------------------------------
464
465Fonts
466
467     The fonts used by Tux Paint are TrueType Fonts (TTF).
468
469     Simply place them in the "fonts" directory. Tux Paint will load the font
470     and provide four different sizes in the 'Letters' selector when using
471     the 'Text' tool.
472
473     ----------------------------------------------------------------------
474
475'Starters'
476
477     'Starter' images appear in the 'New' dialog, along with solid color
478     background choices. (Note: In earlier versions of Tux Paint, they
479     appeared in the 'Open' dialog, together with saved drawings.)
480
481     Unlike pictures drawn in Tux Paint by users and then opened later,
482     opening a 'starter' creates a new drawing. When you save, the 'starter'
483     image is not overwritten. Additionally, as you edit your new picture,
484     the contents of the original 'starter' affect it.
485
486     Coloring-Book Style
487
488       The most basic kind of 'starter' is similar to a picture in a coloring
489       book. It's an outline of a shape which you can then color in and add
490       details to. In Tux Paint, as you draw, type text, or stamp stamps, the
491       outline remains 'above' what you draw. You can erase the parts of the
492       drawing you made, but you can't erase the outline.
493
494       To create this kind of 'starter' image, simply draw an outlined
495       picture in a paint program, make the rest of the graphic transparent
496       (that will come out as white in Tux Paint), and save it as a PNG
497       format file.
498
499       Note: Previous to Tux Paint 0.9.21, images needed to be black and
500       transparent. As of 0.9.21, if a Starter is black and white, with no
501       transparency, white will be converted to transparent when the Starter
502       is opened.
503
504       Note: Previous to Tux Paint 0.9.22, Starters had to be in PNG or JPEG
505       (backgrounds only) format. As of 0.9.22, they may be in SVG (vector
506       graphics) or KPX (templates from Kid Pix, another childrens' drawing
507       program; they are special files which simply contain a JPEG within).
508
509     Scene-Style
510
511       Along with the 'coloring-book' style overlay, you can also provide a
512       separate background image as part of a 'starter' picture. The overlay
513       acts the same: it can't be drawn over, erased, or affected by 'Magic'
514       tools. However, the background can be!
515
516       When the 'Eraser' tool is used on a picture based on this kind of
517       'starter' image, rather than turning the canvas to a solid color, such
518       as white, it returns that part of the canvas to the original
519       background picture from the 'starter'.
520
521       By creating both an overlay and a background, you can create a
522       'starter' which simulates depth. Imagine a background that shows the
523       ocean, and an overlay that's a picture of a reef. You can then draw
524       (or stamp) fish in the picture. They'll appear in the ocean, but never
525       'in front of' the reef.
526
527       To create this kind of 'starter' picture, simply create an overlay
528       (with transparency) as described above, and save it as a PNG. Then
529       create another image (without transparency), and save it with the same
530       filename, but with "-back" appended to the name. (e.g.,
531       "reef-back.png" would be the background ocean picture that corresponds
532       to the "reef.png" overlay, or foreground.)
533
534     The 'starter' images should be the same size as Tux Paint's canvas. (See
535     the "Loading Other Pictures into Tux Paint" section of README for
536     details on sizing.) If they are not, they will be stretched, without
537     affecting the shape ("aspect ratio"); however some smudging may be
538     applied to the edges.
539
540     Place them in the "starters" directory. When the 'New' dialog is
541     accessed in Tux Paint, the 'starter' images will appear in the screen
542     that appears, after the various solid color choices.
543
544     Note: 'Starters' can't be saved over from within Tux Paint, since
545     loading a 'starter' is really like creating a new image. (Instead of
546     being blank, though there's already something there to work with.) The
547     'Save' command simply creates a new picture, like it would if the 'New'
548     command had been used.
549
550     Note: 'Starters' are 'attached' to saved pictures, via a small text file
551     that has the same name as the saved file, but with ".dat" as the
552     extension. This allows the overlay and background, if any, to continue
553     to affect the drawing even after Tux Paint has been quit, or another
554     picture loaded or started. (In other words, if you base a drawing on a
555     'starter' image, it will always be affected by it.)
556
557     ----------------------------------------------------------------------
558
559'Templates'
560
561     'Template' images also appear in the 'New' dialog, along with solid
562     color background choices and 'Starters'. (Note: Tux Paint prior to
563     version 0.9.22 did not have the 'Template' feature.)
564
565     Unlike pictures drawn in Tux Paint by users and then opened later,
566     opening a 'template' creates a new drawing. When you save, the
567     'template' image is not overwritten. Unlike 'starters', there is no
568     immutable 'layer' above the canvas. You may draw over any part of it.
569
570     When the 'Eraser' tool is used on a picture based on a 'template',
571     rather than turning the canvas to a solid color, such as white, it
572     returns that part of the canvas to the original picture from the
573     'template'.
574
575     'Templates' are simply image files (in PNG, JPG, SVG or KPX format). No
576     preparation or conversion should be required.
577
578     The 'template' images should be the same size as Tux Paint's canvas.
579     (See the "Loading Other Pictures into Tux Paint" section of README for
580     details on sizing.) If they are not, they will be stretched, without
581     affecting the shape ("aspect ratio"); however some smudging may be
582     applied to the edges.
583
584     Place them in the "templates" directory. When the 'New' dialog is
585     accessed in Tux Paint, the 'template' images will appear in the screen
586     that appears, after the various solid color choices and 'starters'.
587
588     Note: 'Templates' can't be saved over from within Tux Paint, since
589     loading a 'template' is really like creating a new image. (Instead of
590     being blank, though there's already something there to work with.) The
591     'Save' command simply creates a new picture, like it would if the 'New'
592     command had been used.
593
594     Note: 'Templates' are 'attached' to saved pictures, via a small text
595     file that has the same name as the saved file, but with ".dat" as the
596     extension. This allows the background to continue to be available to the
597     drawing (e.g., when using the 'Eraser' tool) even after Tux Paint has
598     been quit, or another picture loaded or started. (In other words, if you
599     base a drawing on a 'template' image, it will always be affected by it.)
600
601     ----------------------------------------------------------------------
602
603Translations
604
605     Tux Paint supports numerous languages, thanks to use of the "gettext"
606     localization library. (See OPTIONS for how to change locales in
607     Tux Paint.)
608
609     To translate Tux Paint to a new language, copy the translation template
610     file, "tuxpaint.pot" (found in Tux Paint's source code, in the folder
611     "src/po/"). Rename the copy as a ".po" file, with an appropriate name
612     for the locale you're translating to (e.g., "es.po" for Spanish; or
613     "pt_BR.po" for Brazilian Portuguese, versus "pt.po" or "pt_PT.po" for
614     Portuguese spoken in Portugal.)
615
616     Open the newly-created ".po" file - you can edit in a plain text edtior,
617     such as Emacs, Pico or VI on Linux, or NotePad on Windows. The original
618     English text used in Tux Paint is listed in lines starting with "msgid".
619     Enter your translations of each of these pieces of text in the empty
620     "msgstr" lines directly below the corresponding "msgid" lines. (Note: Do
621     not remove the quotes.)
622
623     Example:
624
625       msgid "Smudge"
626       msgstr "Manchar"
627       
628       msgid "Click and move to draw large bricks."
629       msgstr "Haz clic y arrastra para dibujar ladrillos grandes."
630
631     A graphical tool, called poEdit (http://www.poedit.net/), is available
632     for Linux, Windows and Mac OS X.
633
634     Note: It is best to always work off of the latest Tux Paint text catalog
635     template ("tuxpaint.pot"), since new text is added, and old text is
636     occasionally changed. The text catalog for the upcoming, unreleased
637     version of Tux Paint can be found in Tux Paint's CVS repository (see:
638     http://www.tuxpaint.org/download/source/cvs/), and on the Tux Paint
639     website at http://www.tuxpaint.org/help/po/.
640
641     To edit an existing translation, download the latest ".po" file for that
642     language, and edit it as described above.
643
644     You may send new or edited translation files to Bill Kendrick, lead
645     developer of Tux Paint, at: bill@newbreedsoftware.com, or post them to
646     the "tuxpaint-i18n" mailing list (see: http://www.tuxpaint.org/lists/).
647
648     Alternatively, if you have an account with SourceForge.net, you can
649     request to be added to the "tuxpaint" project and receive write-access
650     to the CVS source code repository so that you may commit your changes
651     directly.
652
653     Note: Additional locale support also requires additions to Tux Paint's
654     source code (/src/i18n.h and /src/i18n.c), and requires updates to the
655     Makefile, to have the ".po" gettext catalog source files compiled into
656     ".mo" files, and installed, for use at runtime.
657
658Alternative Input Methods
659
660     As of version 0.9.17, Tux Paint's "Text" tool can provide alternative
661     input methods for some languages. For example, when Tux Paint is running
662     with a Japanese locale, the right [Alt] key can be pressed to cycle
663     between Latin, Romanized Hiragana and Romanized Katakana modes. This
664     allows native characters and words to be entered into the "Text" tool by
665     typing one or more keys on a keyboard with Latin characters (e.g., a
666     US QWERTY keyboard).
667
668     To create an input method for a new locale, create a text file with a
669     name based on the locale (e.g., "ja" for Japanese), with ".im" as the
670     extension (e.g., "ja.im").
671
672     The ".im" file can have multiple character mapping sections for
673     different character mapping modes. For example, on a Japanese typing
674     system, typing [K] [A] in Hiragana mode generates a different Unicode
675     character than typing [K] [A] in Katakana mode.
676
677     List the character mappings in this file, one per line. Each line should
678     contain (separated by whitespace):
679
680       * the Unicode value of the character, in hexadecimal (more than one
681         character can be listed, separated by a colon (':'), this allowing
682         some sequences to map to words)
683       * the keycode sequence (the ASCII characters that must be entered to
684         generate the Unicode character)
685       * a flag (or "-")
686
687     Start additional character mapping sections with a line containign the
688     word "section".
689
690     Example:
691
692       # Hiragana
693       304B   ka   -
694       304C   ga   -
695       304D   ki   -
696       304E   gi   -
697       304D:3083   kya   -
698       3063:305F   tta   -
699       
700       # Katakana
701       section
702       30AB   ka   -
703       30AC   ga   -
704       30AD   ki   -
705       30AE   gi   -
706
707     Note: Blank lines within the ".im" file will be ignored, as will any
708     text following a "#" (pound/hash) character - it can be used to denote
709     comments, as seen in the example above.
710
711     Note: Meanings of the flags are locale-specific, and are processed by
712     the language-specific source code in "src/im.c". For example, "b" is
713     used in Korean to handle Batchim, which may carry over to the next
714     character.
715
716     Note: Additional input method support also requires additions to
717     Tux Paint's source code (/src/im.c), and requires updates to the
718     Makefile, to have the ".im" files installed, for use at runtime.
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